Just Had a Baby? 6 Tips to Make Your Relocation Easier

Babies are bundles of joy, but they are also lots of work. If you’re relocating with a new baby, there are many things you can do to make your relocation smooth. These tips can make your relocation easier overall. Here’s what you need to know.

1. Make a Box or Bag of Baby Essentials

First, create a list of the necessary items you need for your baby. The list should include diapers, baby food, bottles, formula, extra clothes, toys, and other must-have items for your baby during this transition. Since you will be using these essential items right up until the time you depart, you will need to plan to pack the box shortly before you leave.

You may even need several boxes or bags of these baby essentials, depending on the details of your particular household relocation.

If you’re packing things into a box, be sure to label the box and keep that box separate from the other moving cartons. You don’t want to lose track of the box and find yourself unable to find the baby things you need!

2. Research Pediatricians Before You Get There

Find a pediatrician before you get to your new home to ensure that your baby is protected and will have proper medical care if needed. If your baby gets sick or needs help from a doctor shortly after your relocation, you could feel panicky as you search for a doctor. Establish contact with that new pediatrician to find out what you need to do to become a verified patient.

3. Secure Help with Trusted Caregivers

Do you need someone to watch your baby while you pack or when the movers come to move the boxes? If so, get help from someone you trust. This may be a babysitter, a friend, or even a relative. Getting help from someone you trust will give you peace of mind knowing that your baby is being well cared for while you relocate.

4. Have a Baby Proofing Plan

Baby proofing your new home will help make your new house safe for your little one. You may need to buy new babyproofing items for your new home. If this is the case, purchase them before you move so that you can get them set up in your new home as soon as you arrive.

5. Unpack the Nursery First

Prioritize setting up the nursery first upon your arrival. This way, you have a place to change your baby, and they have room to nap and sleep on the first night in your new house. Configure your baby’s room as close to their previous nursery as possible. The familiarity might help you and comfort your baby during the transition.

6. Work With Professional Movers

Hire professional movers to assist you with all the heavy lifting on your moving day. Let the movers handle the challenging and overwhelming logistics so you can focus on your baby.

Hire movers to handle your relocation. To get started with your upcoming move, hire the pros. Contact us today.

5 Tips for Clearing Out Your Pantry Before Your Move

In the weeks and days leading up to a move, the chances are you’ll have a lot of food to eat up or clear out. Emptying your pantry makes for a lighter relocation, saves money on takeout, and reduces food waste. Here are a few tips for clearing out your pantry before your household move.

1. Check Expiration Dates

First, check expiration dates and discard any food items that have exceeded their date stamp. Next, choose non-expired food you will probably not plan to eat and consider donating these items to a local food bank. Finally, you can use any unexpired food to help plan meals for when you’re still living in your home.

2. Take Inventory of Food You Have

You can make excellent healthy, and well-rounded meals using these main staples along with any fresh veggies or proteins you have in your refrigerator:

  • Dried beans
  • Pasta
  • Rice
  • Canned tomatoes and gravies

You can use canned soup, cereals, oatmeal, and any sauces or condiments with the above staples in a pinch or combine them with proteins you have on hand.

3. Avoid Buying New Food

While it’s likely that you’ll have a few grocery runs during the weeks leading up to your move, try to focus more on using up what you’ve already got. Plan meals using these foods instead – plug in your ingredients into an online search engine designed for no waste when it comes to food, and come up with creative new meal ideas. Then, if you’re short an ingredient or two, when you go shopping, stick to your list to ensure you don’t overbuy.

4. Carefully Pack Foods You Don’t Finish

Dry goods are very move-friendly. You can safely move foods like dry pasta, cereals, grains, herbs, condiments, and baking ingredients, even if the packages are open — as long as you seal the open containers with tape.

Other preventative steps include using resealable plastic bags around items that might leak or spill. For example, flour and sugar can be messy, so after you tape the container closed, place them in a plastic bag for added protection. Then place them in the moving carton. Lastly, label each food box so it is highlighted and can be stored accordingly during transport.

5. Discard What You Can’t Eat

Discard any remaining items in the end that are either half-used or otherwise unable to be transported or donated. Reduce waste by recycling cans, boxes, or glass once you empty the last of your pantry.

We Can Help Make Your Move Easy!

With good planning, you can reduce your pantry stuff significantly by the time you move. The above steps will help you reduce food waste, help others in need through donations, and provide tasty easy-to-make meals in the remaining days before your move.

Are you interested in a free quote? Contact us today. We’re happy to answer any questions or provide information about the additional moving services we offer.

Settling in as a Singleton: Putting Yourself out There

It’s exciting, unfamiliar and even a little scary, so keep in mind that your journey to a new place is also a journey to a different way of living, too. In fact, finding home as a singleton could be one of the most amazing adventures you’ll ever have.   

Whether you’re recently uncoupled, widowed or striking out on your own after living with a roommate (or two), the important thing is you’re part of a new community that’s full of new people to meet, places to explore and stuff to do. 

Here are five basic tips every singleton like you needs to consider in order to make this new chapter in your life the best yet. 

Be Smart about Safety and Security 

Unless it’s a brand-new space, you never know to whom the previous owner or tenant gave their keys. If possible, have the locks changed, and consider getting a home security system or door camera. When you move with Mayflower, you could qualify for a complimentary doorbell camera and free installation with one of ADT’s top authorized dealers.

And while this might seem a little paradoxical, urban singletons — especially apartment dwellers who don’t have a door attendant — need to find a Keeper of the Keys. This could be your super, a nearby friend or a reliable neighbor. After all, it’s no fun calling a locksmith at 2 a.m. when your keys have gone missing. 

Leverage Social Connections (and Social Media) 

In a lot of cases, you’ll know people (or people who know people) who live in the area. They can provide a much-needed extra level of support until you get your bearings. New co-workers are also a great resource for advice on what to see and do.  

Get the word out on channels like Instagram and Facebook and ask your contacts to connect you to anyone locally they might know. That said, it can be all too easy (especially if you tend to be a bit shy) to substitute social media for “real” life. Don’t hide behind a screen; this is the time to make human connections. 

Get out and about 

It takes time after you’ve moved in before you’re able to settle into a routine. Take advantage of this window — step out of your comfort zone, and by all means keep your eyes, ears and mind open. 

Scope out the new neighborhood. You’ll soon see the areas where married couples live with kids; younger singles hang out; major shopping districts are located; and people gather on weekends and after work. A stroll down Main Street is a wonderful way to feel part of your new community, let people know you’ve arrived, and familiarize yourself with the town’s pace and vibe.  

If your new home is in a bigger city, use public transportation. That’s how the locals do it and as soon as you’ve mastered the nuances (and let’s face it, peculiarities) of the city’s mass transit system, the sooner you’ll feel at home. Larger cities will also have culture-rich neighborhoods full of authentic fare, as well as cultural experiences waiting to be explored.  

If you live in a touristy area, by all means be a tourist yourself and get the sightseeing out of your system while you’re still new in town. Odds are you’ll avoid them once you’ve settled into town. However, it’d be weird to live in, say, Seattle without having been to the Space Needle. 

Put Yourself on a Budget 

While visiting local hot spots or dining in restaurants may sound wonderful, new singletons should always be careful about overspending, especially during the first few months. For one thing, expenses will almost certainly be higher since you’re solely responsible for the mortgage or rent, food and utilities.  

If you’re coming from a roommate or partner arrangement, you’ll need extra funds to buy the stuff you used to share communally, like furniture, appliances, and pots and pans. The upside is you’ll finally be able to truly decorate according to your own personal style. 

Another “budget” to think about is your time. Remember you’re no longer sharing household chores, lawncare and/or pet care responsibilities. Factor in some extra time to handle these additional duties. 

Deep Dive into Your New Community 

Be a joiner. It’s the best way to make new friends and open yourself up to new possibilities. For some this may be joining a place of worship or a community center. Others might find volunteering for a non-profit, participating in a book club or playing on a local amateur sports team more their style.   

If you live in a city, it’s also wise to invest in a museum membership: they often host members-only events full of people with shared interests. Feeling brave? Try something you’ve never done before. Whether it’s a pottery class, a neighborhood clean-up or a Zumba session, it’s the perfect way to make friends with people exploring new things just like you.  

As you explore and settle into your new neighborhood, we’re here to help. Be sure to check out our blog for tips to help your new city feel familiar — and help you feel at home. 

7 Things to Consider When Relocating or Expanding Your Company

If done correctly, relocating or expanding your business to a new place can increase your revenues and profitability. However, it also requires some adjustment. Here are things to consider when relocating or expanding your company.

1. Site Selection

When selecting your new company location, consider why you are moving or expanding. For example, is one of your goals to move closer to potential or current customers? Or, are you seeking to locate operations in a lower-cost city? Your goals will guide you toward an initial list of potential cities.

Before you make a final choice, ask other business owners what they think of the location. Also, check if local organizations or governments provide relocation assistance, such as tax incentives, training grants, and site development help.

2. Market Research

Research the demographics, competitive landscape, and needs in the prospective location to ensure your product or service has a niche there. Also, understand consumer habits in the region before making a move. Your lender will want to ensure you’ve completed this research step if you need financing.

3. Financing

Often, a business expansion requires financing either through a loan or the equity of the current or additional owners. Before the move, consider which of these options will work best for you and take steps to put your financing in place.

4. Ecosystem Support

If you are trying to break into a new market, you’ll want as much support as possible. Consider who in your network knows people within the new ecosystem and ask them to help you create relationships in the new location.

5. Cost

Cost is a critical factor in every business decision, including locations. Cost affects you in several ways. The first is the rent, taxes, and utilities you’ll pay for the new space. The second is the cost of living for employees. If you’re moving from an inexpensive region of the country to a more expensive one, you’ll need to pay much higher wages to convince employees to work for you in the new location.

If you want to expand to an area with a small budget, consider the minimum viable expansion option to achieve your goals. For example, you may not necessarily need to open a large office at first. Perhaps you can start with a smaller space and one or two employees to test the market before committing to a more extensive operation.

6. Culture and Customs

Cities have different cultures. Some regions, for example, are more casual about appropriate dress or time schedules, while others are more formal. Employees also differ in their expectations of employers based on region.

7. Leadership Options

If you are relocating, you’ll want to identify key leadership candidates among your current staff and offer the necessary relocation packages to encourage them to relocate.

If you are expanding into a new location, you’ll also likely want an employee to relocate to head the new venture, at least initially. A current employee understands your company values and can better represent the brand than a new one. Once settled, you can hire a new head from among the local staff.

Office Movers, You Can Trust

Contact us for help with your office relocation. In addition, we can help you with the planning and execution of this significant undertaking.

How to Pack Your Car for a Cross-Country Move

It’s an understatement to say there are a lot of things to keep track of during a cross-country move. And if you have belongings, kids, fur babies and a vehicle you’ve opted to drive to your new address, there’s a cross-country road trip to think about, too. 

To ensure your long-distance move goes smoothly, it helps to plan what to pack in your car — and know how to make it all fit so you minimize stress, mitigate surprises and make an adventure out of the road ahead.  

The first place to start? With a spare key to avoid lockouts. And that important paperwork and other non-allowable items? Those irreplaceable keepsakes? Keep them with you.  

Pack Layers of Clothing 

It goes without saying, but you need clothes — specifically enough clothes and the right kind of clothing for the conditions you’ll encounter. Depending on where you’re moving, you may encounter a variety of climates — even unpredictable weather. Make sure you pack layers and do include a jacket or coat since you never know what the weather holds at varying elevations or weather patterns that are beyond your control.  

  • Layers of clothing that account for changes in weather and temperature 
  • Loungewear or pajamas 
  • Workwear if required 
  • Extra undergarments and socks 

Don’t Forget the Toiletries 

Comfort, hygiene and self-care are also key when you’re on the road, so these items prove helpful as well: 

  • Light blankets and pillows for napping 
  • Facewash, shampoo, conditioner, soap and styling products 
  • Toothpaste, toothbrush and mouthwash 
  • Lotion 

Remember to Pack Snacks 

Keep grouchy kids and hangry adults at bay by packing portable, healthy snacks. 

A cooler filled with drinks and temperature-sensitive snacks, sandwiches, veggies and fruit 

  • Nuts, dried fruit, crackers 
  • Utensils 
  • Napkins 
  • Single-serve condiments 

Keep Everyone Entertained Throughout the Journey 

Limit the “are we there yet” by bringing enough things to entertain the whole gang for the duration of the drive. 

  • Music 
  • Audio books 
  • Road trip games 
  • Travel-friendly toys 
  • Tablet for streaming shows and movies 
  • Cords for charging your gear 
  • Portable chargers 

Make Sure Your Pets are Comfortable and Cared For 

Traveling with your furry friends? You need to keep them comfortable and safe, too. 

  • Pet carrier(s) that accommodate  
  • Litter box for cats 
  • Leashes and collars/harnesses  
  • Pet identification tags 
  • Up-to-date immunization and ownership records 
  • Pet beds 
  • No-spill food and water dishes 
  • Anti-anxiety medication 
  • Toys 
  • Food and food dishes 
  • Treats 

Prepare for the Unexpected with a First Aid Kit 

Hopefully, you’ll never need to kiss boo-boos and apply band-aids. However, it’s important to be prepared, just in case. Your first aid kit should contain: 

  • Sterile cleaning pads  
  • Antibacterial ointment 
  • Band-aids 
  • Tweezers 
  • A small pair of scissors 
  • Aspirin and Ibuprofen  
  • Instant cold or hot compress 
  • Sterile gauze pads 
  • Stretchy bandage wrap  
  • Non-latex gloves 
  • Cloth tape 

Invest in an Emergency Car Care Kit 

No one wants to think about a vehicle breakdown. Still, you should be prepared in the event an issue occurs. 

  • Jumper cables 
  • Tire pressure gauge 
  • Spare tire 
  • Reflective warning triangle and flares 
  • Safety hammer and seatbelt cutters 
  • Tow rope 
  • Hand crank 
  • Safety vest 
  • Folding garden/snow shovel 
  • Blanket 
  • Snow scraper 
  • Anti-slip gloves 
  • PVC tape 
  • Tool kit 

Miscellaneous Things to Bring on a Cross-Country Drive 

There are a number of basic odds and ends that are worth bringing along on your cross-country move. 

  • A roll of paper towels 
  • A jug of water 
  • Garbage bags 
  • Hand sanitizer and sanitizing spray 
  • Cleaning wipes 
  • Wet wipes 
  • Baby wipes 
  • Kleenex 

How to Pack Your Car for a Cross-Country Move 

If you plan on packing luggage or equipment on the top of your vehicle, make sure that it is securely tied down. It helps to use a specially designed cargo compartments — such as an adjustable, waterproof, soft-sided roof rack — that can be secured to the top of a vehicle. Never pack valuables on the exterior of your car since they could be stolen. 

As for how to keep it all organized, clear plastic bins let you see what’s inside so you don’t have to dig. Soft-sided bins work well for items you’re less likely to need access to. As for heavier items, they should go inside — not on top of — your vehicle. Take care to pack them below lighter items that could get damaged or crushed. 

Looking for more tips on how to streamline and simplify your long-distance move? Visit our blog for expert tips and tricks. 

How to Find Daycare in Your New Neighborhood

Finding good child care can be challenging, yet it is a priority when you make a household move into a new community. Here are some tips for finding daycare or other forms of child care in your new neighborhood.

Start Early

Start looking as soon as you know about your move. Some areas have a shortage of reasonable care, especially for infants who require a smaller child-to-adult ratio. Doing your research and applying early improves your chances of finding a slot in a highly-rated center.

Determine Your Child’s Individual Needs

Every child is unique and has unique needs. If you are already using daycare, you may know the types of programs that work best for your child. However, consult your pediatrician before deciding if your child has a chronic physical condition, such as asthma, diabetes, seizures, or allergies.

Use Apps and Websites

Various apps and websites can help with your initial search. Childcare.gov will link you to state child care search websites. Other apps include:

  • Winnie, a marketplace of daycare and preschool programs that is available on a site and an app
  • Sittercity, a Web-based platform to connect parents with sitters and nannies
  • Momni, an app that offers global care-sharing
  • UrbanSitter, an app and Website platform that provides sitters, nannies, and tutors
  • Care.com, a site that helps you find nannies, babysitters, tutors, and daycare facilities in your neighborhood

Visit Each Program

Visit each finalist in person to see what the classrooms and play areas look like, how teachers interact with students, and what a child’s typical day will be like. If you hire a nanny, interview the finalists carefully and see how your child and the prospective choice interact.

Specifically, look for things such as:

  • Can teachers always see the children?
  • Do teachers look the child in the eye when they speak to them?
  • Are both indoor and outdoor spaces used for play? And does the program offer a variety of toys?
  • Do you hear laughter?
  • Are areas clean and clean-smelling?

Ask questions, such as the program’s philosophy, how they handle challenging behaviors, and staff turnover rates. Ask how often children are allowed to play outside and how the program lessens the spread of disease.

Check Quality Ratings, Accreditation and Licensing

Not all states require daycare programs to be licensed, but the best programs usually are. Even among states that require licensing, New York requires a five-to-one adult-child ratio for 2-year-olds, but Florida requires an 11-to-1 ratio. Be sure you understand what licensing means in your new state.

Some child care programs are accredited through professional organizations, such as the National Association for the Education of Young Children. Accredited programs will also meet specific quality standards.

Finally, check quality ratings. Most states use symbols, such as stars, to indicate quality. The provider earns more stars as they meet additional quality standards. Remember that each state has its own quality standards and rating system, so research what each rating means in your new community. Your state’s resource page can provide more details about ratings.

Online reviews are another way to gauge whether a program is doing a good job.

Making the Move

Are you planning your relocation? You undoubtedly face a lot of work and tough choices during your move. Let us help with your relocation. We can handle the packing and heavy lifting. Contact us today for a free quote.

Relocating for a Partner? Here’s How to Make the Right Moves Together

Believe it or not, there’s a name for people who relocate on behalf of a significant other: “trailing partners.” Ok, that sounds a bit harsh, but it doesn’t necessarily mean you’re second fiddle. In fact, this unique moving situation can be mutually beneficial. It’s all about viewing it not just as an opportunity for your partner, but for you as well.  

You’re in a relationship because you care – and care deeply – about someone besides yourself (that’s a big plus right there). What’s most important right now is a bit of planning, a lot of soul searching and a willingness to stay open-minded and make some very important decisions together. 

Here are a few tips and tricks for helping you and your loved one navigate this new chapter in your lives:  

Do the Due Diligence 

Before a final decision is made, you should have already investigated – and determined – what life might look like after you move. This is where the two of you might want to make a list of all the pros and cons. 

  • If it’s because of your partner’s promotion or a new job with a heftier salary, make sure you’ve investigated the cost of living in your new city. What looks like a big pay increase on paper could be a step down if you’re relocating from a relatively inexpensive area to someplace like the San Francisco Bay Area. Also, does your partner’s new job offer strong prospects for a steady move up their career ladder? 
  • If it’s because your partner will be caring for a parent or other loved one, the two of you need to decide whether it makes more sense to move them vs. the two of you (and potentially your immediate family). Conversely, would you be leaving family who may need your support now or down the road? 
  • How will the move affect any children still living at home? For example, are the schools good, is the area safe? In general, a long-distance move is probably less of an adjustment for a grade schooler than it is for a teen entering their senior year of high school.   
  • Will the current trend toward hybrid and remote work provide new opportunities you can leverage to your advantage? 
  •  As the trailing partner, will you be able to find a good job in the new location – and a rewarding social life? Some bigger companies offer placement assistance for an employee’s significant other. Check into it. 
  • What is there to do – and see – there? Does the new location offer comparable sports, entertainment and cultural options? 

Make Your Voice – and Needs – Heard 

As the trailing partner, it’s natural to feel a loss of control – and even a little resentment – but keep the bigger picture in mind. Once the decision’s been made, actively participate in the process. A good partnership needs to flex well beyond 50/50 and with a major change like this, there’s not always going to be a one-size-fits-all solution. Open the door for honest discussions and be prepared for some give and take.  

Schedule a Visit 

Let’s assume you both did an online “deep dive” as part of the due diligence process. Now it’s time to plan a visit to your new city and get a sense of what it would be like to live there. Both partners will feel a lot more excited about the move if you spend time together exploring the new neighborhood. Consider what’s important to you and other family members and don’t rely totally on online reviews and others’ opinions. Here are some tips and tricks you can use to feel at home in your new neighborhood.

Keep Your Options Open 

Before committing to buying a home and settling down, it might be a wise move to rent a place for a year or two. Then if the situation changes or the new job doesn’t work out, you’ll still have your old home to fall back on. Could your partner’s new situation lend itself to a remote or hybrid work set-up? Perhaps a remote work situation combined with a temporary period of living in both places (with regular visits) could ease the transition into your new life together.

Wherever You Go, Be There for Each Other 

Whether they’re starting a new job, getting a big promotion or taking care of a close family member, always keep in mind that your partner’s going through a significant change in their life too! Look for ways to be supportive and understanding. And reach out to them for the same!  

Whether you’re in a new city right now or considering finding a new home, we’re here to not just move you, but help you feel at home along the way.

5 Home Security Tips for Your New Home

When you choose a new home, security might be an afterthought. That is, of course, until you move in and want to protect yourself and your belongings.

Home security can be an essential part of the residential moving process. Follow these tips to ensure you have the proper home security for your new space.

1. Increase the Lighting

If you haven’t had the opportunity, survey your home at night. It will be easier to spot dark areas. That way, you can figure out where you need to add lighting.

Motion-sensor lighting for your driveway and backyard is a wise idea. Add other types of lighting on a timer. Consider the lighting angle so it doesn’t keep you up at night.

Choosing outdoor lighting is less complicated than it used to be. You might be able to install battery-operated or solar-powered options in a few hours.

2. Make Valuables Hard to Find

As a general rule, burglars look for an easy win. They want to get something valuable with as little work as possible. Your goal is to make it harder for them.

Keep your valuables out of sight. Don’t place expensive equipment in easy view of a window. Do the same for your vehicle.

If you have expensive or irreplaceable things, consider additional protection for them. A small safe might be an ideal solution. You might even decide to store them elsewhere.

3. Change the Locks

When you get the keys to your new home, it’s a good idea to change the locks. Keys are easy to duplicate. Assume that any or all of your neighbors might have a copy.

If you are handy, take care of the switch; otherwise, consult a professional locksmith, and set a time for them to change the locks. They may be able to do this within a few hours.

Once you get the new locks, be careful where you put the keys. Leaving a set on your home exterior puts you at risk. Instead, consider giving an extra set to a trusted friend nearby.

4. Add Cameras

These days, it’s prevalent to put in a doorbell camera system at your front door. They often work in conjunction with alarm systems.

If you have other exterior doors, think about adding cameras for those. It’s essential for parts of the home that you can’t see from a window.

Keep in mind that cameras are only helpful if you use them. Installing a system with alerts might be the best approach.

5. Set Alarms

For the highest level of security, you might consider installing an alarm system. With this type of protection, you outsource some work to a third party. They help you keep an eye on your home and alert authorities if necessary.

Choose the most straightforward and consistent system that you can. If it’s too difficult to use, you won’t use it. Also, make sure that the control panel isn’t visible from the outside of the house.

Moving Assistance

Protecting your home takes multiple systems. To learn more about how you can have a better moving experience, request a free quote today.

Moving in Summer 2022: Tips and Guide

Don’t Delay — Book Your Move Early

Although high demand and limited mover availability continue to impact delivery times in some areas of the country, our agents are working hard to meet your needs during this year’s peak moving season. We also want to help you navigate the process so it’s easy and stress-free.  

Have extra time or flexibility? Book early — as far in advance as possible is best. Not an option? Read on for expert tips and advice from our pros.  

How Early Should I Book My Move?

Booking your move well in advance lets us more efficiently plan and manage everything around your relocation and helps us put time on your side. Learn more about booking your specific move type.

What To Do If Your Preferred Move Date is Unavailable

During this year’s summer moving season, booking early is recommended. If that’s simply not an option and you know you want a full-service move, consider this advice from our experts. 

Real Movers Versus Fake Movers: How to Spot the Difference

Regardless of who you move with, we want to help ensure you’re not the victim of a moving scam. Get tips on what to look for. 

fake and poor movers
moving checklist

The Ultimate Moving Checklist

We can help you get organized for your move eight weeks in advance. Check out our comprehensive checklist to streamline and simplify the tasks at hand. Stay Organized with Our Moving Checklists

How to Pack Your Car and What to Put in It When You Move

So much more than a road trip, packing your car for a cross-country move can be daunting. Get advice and how to pack it and what goes inside. 

packing the car for a move
Before your items arrive

What to Do While Waiting for Your Belongings to Arrive

Sometimes there will still be a lag between when your valuables are scheduled to arrive and when you cross the threshold of your new front door. We have some tips for you to make the most out of this waiting time.

7 Ways to Manage Moving Stress

Moving isn’t easy. Read about ways to manage the process while maintaining your well-being — even in the midst of challenging times

Removing stress from moving
Covid 19 status

Questions About Moving During COVID-19

As we keep your wellbeing top of mind, learn about our COVID-19 protocols and get answers to frequently asked questions.

7 Ways to Manage Moving Stress

Given people move for many reasons — both happy and sad — it stands to reason stress and a wide array of other emotions are involved. As moving industry veterans who have been on the receiving end of the very same experience, we’d like to offer tips to help get you through the process and prepare you for the next chapter in your life. 

1 – Start Early 

Be sure to book your move as far in advance as you possibly can (as soon as you know your preferred move date is recommended). Not only will this help you secure your preferred move date, it will also carve out time to tackle your moving checklist in digestible steps. Plus, you can use the time to sift through, sell and donate unwanted goods so you’re not paying to move items you don’t really need.

2 – Carve out a Peaceful Retreat 

When you’re packing and unpacking, your home can feel cluttered — even chaotic. It’s important to have a peaceful respite where you can unwind and detach from the mayhem. Whether it’s your patio, reading room or a basement nook, having a spot to meditate, reflect or straight-up unwind is key.  

3 – Keep Self-Care Items Handy 

When you’re feeling overwhelmed, it’s easy to forget the importance of caring for yourself. Be sure you set aside some items that promote mindfulness, relaxation and self-care. Enjoy spas? Facemasks and eye pads lend luxury — and, if only for a moment, block out the outside world. Like hitting the greens? A golf club and a bucket of balls might make sense. Whether you’re a lover of literature, a painter or a musician, having a few favorite items to turn to during downtime has a calming effect.  

4 – Ask Friends and Family for Help 

It‘s rare that work deadlines, carpooling kids and household responsibilities can be put on hold — even when you’re moving.  It’s okay to admit when you need a hand. Help with packing, unpacking or babysitting kids gives you dedicated time to accomplish what you need to. 

5 – Keep Essential Documents Together and Accessible 

When you’re moving, the last thing you need is to dig through packed boxes to find something important. Be sure to gather your essential documents — from mortgage and lease paperwork to passports and signed moving agreements — putting them in a folder or file you can easily access. 

6 – Make a List of To-Dos in Your New Neighborhood 

Recognizing there is a light at the end of the tunnel is important for your psyche. Make a list of places you want to check out and things you want to do in your new neighborhood once you arrive. In addition to building excitement, it’ll help you get the lay of the land. Need advice? Our city guides can help.   

7 – Say Goodbye to Friends and Special Places 

Memories were made and friendships forged at your soon-to-be former address. Getting closure by visiting your favorite spots or friends ties up loose ends and readies you for the new beginning that lies ahead.  

As bittersweet as the process can be, we’re here to move you so you can continue your journey in a new home. Be sure to check out our blog for great moving tips and advice. Want to learn more about booking with Mayflower? We’re here to help.