7 Things to Consider When Relocating or Expanding Your Company

If done correctly, relocating or expanding your business to a new place can increase your revenues and profitability. However, it also requires some adjustment. Here are things to consider when relocating or expanding your company.

1. Site Selection

When selecting your new company location, consider why you are moving or expanding. For example, is one of your goals to move closer to potential or current customers? Or, are you seeking to locate operations in a lower-cost city? Your goals will guide you toward an initial list of potential cities.

Before you make a final choice, ask other business owners what they think of the location. Also, check if local organizations or governments provide relocation assistance, such as tax incentives, training grants, and site development help.

2. Market Research

Research the demographics, competitive landscape, and needs in the prospective location to ensure your product or service has a niche there. Also, understand consumer habits in the region before making a move. Your lender will want to ensure you’ve completed this research step if you need financing.

3. Financing

Often, a business expansion requires financing either through a loan or the equity of the current or additional owners. Before the move, consider which of these options will work best for you and take steps to put your financing in place.

4. Ecosystem Support

If you are trying to break into a new market, you’ll want as much support as possible. Consider who in your network knows people within the new ecosystem and ask them to help you create relationships in the new location.

5. Cost

Cost is a critical factor in every business decision, including locations. Cost affects you in several ways. The first is the rent, taxes, and utilities you’ll pay for the new space. The second is the cost of living for employees. If you’re moving from an inexpensive region of the country to a more expensive one, you’ll need to pay much higher wages to convince employees to work for you in the new location.

If you want to expand to an area with a small budget, consider the minimum viable expansion option to achieve your goals. For example, you may not necessarily need to open a large office at first. Perhaps you can start with a smaller space and one or two employees to test the market before committing to a more extensive operation.

6. Culture and Customs

Cities have different cultures. Some regions, for example, are more casual about appropriate dress or time schedules, while others are more formal. Employees also differ in their expectations of employers based on region.

7. Leadership Options

If you are relocating, you’ll want to identify key leadership candidates among your current staff and offer the necessary relocation packages to encourage them to relocate.

If you are expanding into a new location, you’ll also likely want an employee to relocate to head the new venture, at least initially. A current employee understands your company values and can better represent the brand than a new one. Once settled, you can hire a new head from among the local staff.

Office Movers, You Can Trust

Contact us for help with your office relocation. In addition, we can help you with the planning and execution of this significant undertaking.

How to Pack Your Car for a Cross-Country Move

It’s an understatement to say there are a lot of things to keep track of during a cross-country move. And if you have belongings, kids, fur babies and a vehicle you’ve opted to drive to your new address, there’s a cross-country road trip to think about, too. 

To ensure your long-distance move goes smoothly, it helps to plan what to pack in your car — and know how to make it all fit so you minimize stress, mitigate surprises and make an adventure out of the road ahead.  

The first place to start? With a spare key to avoid lockouts. And that important paperwork and other non-allowable items? Those irreplaceable keepsakes? Keep them with you.  

Pack Layers of Clothing 

It goes without saying, but you need clothes — specifically enough clothes and the right kind of clothing for the conditions you’ll encounter. Depending on where you’re moving, you may encounter a variety of climates — even unpredictable weather. Make sure you pack layers and do include a jacket or coat since you never know what the weather holds at varying elevations or weather patterns that are beyond your control.  

  • Layers of clothing that account for changes in weather and temperature 
  • Loungewear or pajamas 
  • Workwear if required 
  • Extra undergarments and socks 

Don’t Forget the Toiletries 

Comfort, hygiene and self-care are also key when you’re on the road, so these items prove helpful as well: 

  • Light blankets and pillows for napping 
  • Facewash, shampoo, conditioner, soap and styling products 
  • Toothpaste, toothbrush and mouthwash 
  • Lotion 

Remember to Pack Snacks 

Keep grouchy kids and hangry adults at bay by packing portable, healthy snacks. 

A cooler filled with drinks and temperature-sensitive snacks, sandwiches, veggies and fruit 

  • Nuts, dried fruit, crackers 
  • Utensils 
  • Napkins 
  • Single-serve condiments 

Keep Everyone Entertained Throughout the Journey 

Limit the “are we there yet” by bringing enough things to entertain the whole gang for the duration of the drive. 

  • Music 
  • Audio books 
  • Road trip games 
  • Travel-friendly toys 
  • Tablet for streaming shows and movies 
  • Cords for charging your gear 
  • Portable chargers 

Make Sure Your Pets are Comfortable and Cared For 

Traveling with your furry friends? You need to keep them comfortable and safe, too. 

  • Pet carrier(s) that accommodate  
  • Litter box for cats 
  • Leashes and collars/harnesses  
  • Pet identification tags 
  • Up-to-date immunization and ownership records 
  • Pet beds 
  • No-spill food and water dishes 
  • Anti-anxiety medication 
  • Toys 
  • Food and food dishes 
  • Treats 

Prepare for the Unexpected with a First Aid Kit 

Hopefully, you’ll never need to kiss boo-boos and apply band-aids. However, it’s important to be prepared, just in case. Your first aid kit should contain: 

  • Sterile cleaning pads  
  • Antibacterial ointment 
  • Band-aids 
  • Tweezers 
  • A small pair of scissors 
  • Aspirin and Ibuprofen  
  • Instant cold or hot compress 
  • Sterile gauze pads 
  • Stretchy bandage wrap  
  • Non-latex gloves 
  • Cloth tape 

Invest in an Emergency Car Care Kit 

No one wants to think about a vehicle breakdown. Still, you should be prepared in the event an issue occurs. 

  • Jumper cables 
  • Tire pressure gauge 
  • Spare tire 
  • Reflective warning triangle and flares 
  • Safety hammer and seatbelt cutters 
  • Tow rope 
  • Hand crank 
  • Safety vest 
  • Folding garden/snow shovel 
  • Blanket 
  • Snow scraper 
  • Anti-slip gloves 
  • PVC tape 
  • Tool kit 

Miscellaneous Things to Bring on a Cross-Country Drive 

There are a number of basic odds and ends that are worth bringing along on your cross-country move. 

  • A roll of paper towels 
  • A jug of water 
  • Garbage bags 
  • Hand sanitizer and sanitizing spray 
  • Cleaning wipes 
  • Wet wipes 
  • Baby wipes 
  • Kleenex 

How to Pack Your Car for a Cross-Country Move 

If you plan on packing luggage or equipment on the top of your vehicle, make sure that it is securely tied down. It helps to use a specially designed cargo compartments — such as an adjustable, waterproof, soft-sided roof rack — that can be secured to the top of a vehicle. Never pack valuables on the exterior of your car since they could be stolen. 

As for how to keep it all organized, clear plastic bins let you see what’s inside so you don’t have to dig. Soft-sided bins work well for items you’re less likely to need access to. As for heavier items, they should go inside — not on top of — your vehicle. Take care to pack them below lighter items that could get damaged or crushed. 

Looking for more tips on how to streamline and simplify your long-distance move? Visit our blog for expert tips and tricks. 

How to Find Daycare in Your New Neighborhood

Finding good child care can be challenging, yet it is a priority when you make a household move into a new community. Here are some tips for finding daycare or other forms of child care in your new neighborhood.

Start Early

Start looking as soon as you know about your move. Some areas have a shortage of reasonable care, especially for infants who require a smaller child-to-adult ratio. Doing your research and applying early improves your chances of finding a slot in a highly-rated center.

Determine Your Child’s Individual Needs

Every child is unique and has unique needs. If you are already using daycare, you may know the types of programs that work best for your child. However, consult your pediatrician before deciding if your child has a chronic physical condition, such as asthma, diabetes, seizures, or allergies.

Use Apps and Websites

Various apps and websites can help with your initial search. Childcare.gov will link you to state child care search websites. Other apps include:

  • Winnie, a marketplace of daycare and preschool programs that is available on a site and an app
  • Sittercity, a Web-based platform to connect parents with sitters and nannies
  • Momni, an app that offers global care-sharing
  • UrbanSitter, an app and Website platform that provides sitters, nannies, and tutors
  • Care.com, a site that helps you find nannies, babysitters, tutors, and daycare facilities in your neighborhood

Visit Each Program

Visit each finalist in person to see what the classrooms and play areas look like, how teachers interact with students, and what a child’s typical day will be like. If you hire a nanny, interview the finalists carefully and see how your child and the prospective choice interact.

Specifically, look for things such as:

  • Can teachers always see the children?
  • Do teachers look the child in the eye when they speak to them?
  • Are both indoor and outdoor spaces used for play? And does the program offer a variety of toys?
  • Do you hear laughter?
  • Are areas clean and clean-smelling?

Ask questions, such as the program’s philosophy, how they handle challenging behaviors, and staff turnover rates. Ask how often children are allowed to play outside and how the program lessens the spread of disease.

Check Quality Ratings, Accreditation and Licensing

Not all states require daycare programs to be licensed, but the best programs usually are. Even among states that require licensing, New York requires a five-to-one adult-child ratio for 2-year-olds, but Florida requires an 11-to-1 ratio. Be sure you understand what licensing means in your new state.

Some child care programs are accredited through professional organizations, such as the National Association for the Education of Young Children. Accredited programs will also meet specific quality standards.

Finally, check quality ratings. Most states use symbols, such as stars, to indicate quality. The provider earns more stars as they meet additional quality standards. Remember that each state has its own quality standards and rating system, so research what each rating means in your new community. Your state’s resource page can provide more details about ratings.

Online reviews are another way to gauge whether a program is doing a good job.

Making the Move

Are you planning your relocation? You undoubtedly face a lot of work and tough choices during your move. Let us help with your relocation. We can handle the packing and heavy lifting. Contact us today for a free quote.

Relocating for a Partner? Here’s How to Make the Right Moves Together

Believe it or not, there’s a name for people who relocate on behalf of a significant other: “trailing partners.” Ok, that sounds a bit harsh, but it doesn’t necessarily mean you’re second fiddle. In fact, this unique moving situation can be mutually beneficial. It’s all about viewing it not just as an opportunity for your partner, but for you as well.  

You’re in a relationship because you care – and care deeply – about someone besides yourself (that’s a big plus right there). What’s most important right now is a bit of planning, a lot of soul searching and a willingness to stay open-minded and make some very important decisions together. 

Here are a few tips and tricks for helping you and your loved one navigate this new chapter in your lives:  

Do the Due Diligence 

Before a final decision is made, you should have already investigated – and determined – what life might look like after you move. This is where the two of you might want to make a list of all the pros and cons. 

  • If it’s because of your partner’s promotion or a new job with a heftier salary, make sure you’ve investigated the cost of living in your new city. What looks like a big pay increase on paper could be a step down if you’re relocating from a relatively inexpensive area to someplace like the San Francisco Bay Area. Also, does your partner’s new job offer strong prospects for a steady move up their career ladder? 
  • If it’s because your partner will be caring for a parent or other loved one, the two of you need to decide whether it makes more sense to move them vs. the two of you (and potentially your immediate family). Conversely, would you be leaving family who may need your support now or down the road? 
  • How will the move affect any children still living at home? For example, are the schools good, is the area safe? In general, a long-distance move is probably less of an adjustment for a grade schooler than it is for a teen entering their senior year of high school.   
  • Will the current trend toward hybrid and remote work provide new opportunities you can leverage to your advantage? 
  •  As the trailing partner, will you be able to find a good job in the new location – and a rewarding social life? Some bigger companies offer placement assistance for an employee’s significant other. Check into it. 
  • What is there to do – and see – there? Does the new location offer comparable sports, entertainment and cultural options? 

Make Your Voice – and Needs – Heard 

As the trailing partner, it’s natural to feel a loss of control – and even a little resentment – but keep the bigger picture in mind. Once the decision’s been made, actively participate in the process. A good partnership needs to flex well beyond 50/50 and with a major change like this, there’s not always going to be a one-size-fits-all solution. Open the door for honest discussions and be prepared for some give and take.  

Schedule a Visit 

Let’s assume you both did an online “deep dive” as part of the due diligence process. Now it’s time to plan a visit to your new city and get a sense of what it would be like to live there. Both partners will feel a lot more excited about the move if you spend time together exploring the new neighborhood. Consider what’s important to you and other family members and don’t rely totally on online reviews and others’ opinions. Here are some tips and tricks you can use to feel at home in your new neighborhood.

Keep Your Options Open 

Before committing to buying a home and settling down, it might be a wise move to rent a place for a year or two. Then if the situation changes or the new job doesn’t work out, you’ll still have your old home to fall back on. Could your partner’s new situation lend itself to a remote or hybrid work set-up? Perhaps a remote work situation combined with a temporary period of living in both places (with regular visits) could ease the transition into your new life together.

Wherever You Go, Be There for Each Other 

Whether they’re starting a new job, getting a big promotion or taking care of a close family member, always keep in mind that your partner’s going through a significant change in their life too! Look for ways to be supportive and understanding. And reach out to them for the same!  

Whether you’re in a new city right now or considering finding a new home, we’re here to not just move you, but help you feel at home along the way.