22 Tips to Make Your Moving Day Go Smoothly

A household move can be hectic. The day can go more smoothly, however, if you plan and make good decisions.

Planning Tips

To ensure a smooth moving day, do some preparation. Here are ten tips to help you plan for your moving day.

  1. Prepare a written to-do list for the day well ahead of time so that you know where to begin when you get up on moving day.
  2. If you’ve decided to do your own packing, complete all of it ahead of time except your toiletries. You should even have most of your essentials box packed ahead of time.
  3. Pack a box of cleaning supplies for immediate use in your new home. Take this box with you.
  4. Pack personal documents in a safe box and transport them with you, if possible.
  5. If you live in an apartment or condominium building, check with the building staff ahead of time to ensure you can use the elevator and that the moving van has a place to park. Even if you live in a single-family home, you should alert neighbors of your move ahead of time and be sure the mover has a place to park.
  6. Have the utilities turned off in your old house AFTER your moving day. Moving may take longer than you anticipated, and having the power cut off in the middle of it may not be helpful.
  7. Make arrangements for your children and pets. If you can, have them stay with a neighbor or friend during most of the move. If not, be sure to create a safe room for them.
  8. You’ll want electricity in your new home on moving day, but schedule cable, phone, and Internet for a day after your moving day to avoid being overwhelmed.
  9. Make sure your car is tuned-up and ready for travel.
  10. Fully charge your phone.

Moving Day Tips

You can also take some actions on the day of your move to keep it operating smoothly. Here are 12 tips for the day of your move.

  1. Wake up early. Allow plenty of time for a hearty breakfast and for packing last-minute items.
  2. Wear comfortable clothes and sturdy shoes.
  3. Put your essentials box in your vehicle so the movers won’t accidentally load it into their truck.
  4. Check the bill of lading to ensure it matches the terms of your original service order.
  5. Walk through the house after the van is packed to ensure you’re not leaving anything behind.
  6. Write down the meter readings when you leave and compare the numbers with your final bill when you receive it.
  7. Before you leave, give the movers your mobile number in case either of you gets lost during the move.
  8. When you arrive at your new home, do a walkthrough to be sure everything is where you expect it to be.
  9. Stay organized. Ensure the movers put each box in the right room and avoid putting boxes in the attic or basement. You’re less likely to unpack them once you can no longer see them.
  10. Unpack the essential items first.
  11. Stay hydrated and fed.
  12. Plan something relaxing or celebratory to mark the end of the day.

Planning Your Move?

If you are planning your move, we can assist. We can help with everything from packing to transport and much more. Contact us today for a free quote.  

Moving Your Small Business? Tips to Get Established in a New Community

Moving your small business can be a challenging experience. However, if you’re going through relocation or will soon be relocating, there are many things you can do to jump-start your business in your new community. Below are several ways to establish a customer base in a new town.

1. Get to Know Businesses in Your Community

You’ll face many challenges as a business person. Getting to know other business people in your new community will help you identify the challenges specific to your new area and also allow you to ask other business people what they do to manage those challenges.

To meet other business people, start by visiting businesses in the area and introducing yourself. Leave your card. Let business people know you’re new in town and would love to talk over coffee.

2. Join Organizations That Support Small Businesses

Join your local Chamber of Commerce or another organization in your area designed to support small businesses. If you’re unsure which organizations exist in your new area, inquire at your local city hall or search the Internet. Getting involved in organizations that support small businesses can help you meet local business people while advocating for your business.

3. Get Active on Social Media

Create a social media presence for your business and get involved with community social media pages. Getting active on social media alerts people in your area that your business is in town. Doing this can help generate customer interest and activity.

Social media is also another good way to meet other business people and learn more about your client base. You’ll learn about their preferences and priorities by seeing what people say on social media. This can help you make wise business decisions as you set up shop.

4. Know Your Customers

Whether selling a product in a retail location or running a restaurant, engaging with your clientele is essential. Start by reading about your new community to get to know your customers. Know the demographic information, the most significant local employers, average income, and other statistics.

Consider setting up focus groups or meet and greet opportunities. At these events, you’ll meet customers, find out what they care about, and learn more about how your business can meet their needs.

5. Advertise Discounts and Specials

People love a good deal! So, as soon as your small business opens, advertise for discounts and specials to drive customers in. For example, if your business is a restaurant, offer a free dessert for all dinner customers in the first month you’re open. Also, consider 15% off the “grand opening” sale for the first two weeks if your business is a pet store.

Focus on Your Business – Hire Professional Movers

Your business needs your attention in this new environment. So don’t fret about your relocation; hire professional movers to make your move more manageable and less stressful. Contact us today for a quote.

Spongy Moths: A Household Move Hazard

If you are organizing a household move, you need to beware of an outbreak of a returning outdoor pest that can seriously threaten hardwood trees if you aren’t careful—the spongy moth and its eggs.

These pesky insects are one of the most destructive tree and shrub pests ever introduced into the United States. The spongy moth has defoliated millions of trees, particularly in the Northeast, but is now spreading to more areas of the country.

Previously known as gypsy moths, this species was recently renamed the spongy moth by the Entomological Society of America (ESOA) for their egg masses, which look like sponges. If you aren’t extra careful, you can accidentally transport these pests to your new area when you relocate if you don’t inspect your outdoor belongings before you move.

Spongy moths can defoliate trees quickly and extensively and pose a significant threat to hardwood trees like oak and birch. Therefore, it’s essential to learn about spongy moths, their eggs, how to spot them, and how to manage them so that you don’t risk transporting them from your old home to your new one. In addition, since the eggs can cling to your outdoor furniture, vehicles, equipment, etc., you must learn how to handle them and remove them before loading your moving truck. 

Dealing With Spongy Moths

These moths deposit their eggs in the summer, and the larvae emerge the following spring.

Before loading them into your moving truck or container, you must thoroughly inspect all the outdoor items you plan to move. Pay particular attention to your patio furniture, camping equipment, lawn equipment, grill, bicycles, and other sports equipment like soccer nets. 

Also, check for spongy moths in all their stages, from egg to adult. Here are some things to help:

  • Egg-mass appears sponge-like.
  • Caterpillars have large dark eye spots, blue dots behind their heads, and six pairs of raised red dots along their backs.
  • Female moths are white and have black or brown V-shape designations, and the egg masses are brown and appear sponge-like.
  • Male moths are mottled brown and gray with feathery antennae.

Remove and destroy any bugs or eggs from your belongings. Use a putty knife or stiff brush to scrape them off surfaces. Then place the eggs in a container of hot, soapy water. Or, you can seal them in a plastic bag and then put them in the sun.

Before you move, you must remove all life stages of this destructive spongy moth. In addition, you want to protect your new neighborhood from this invasive pest since it has the potential to attack 300 different kinds of trees and shrubs.

Create your own checklist of items you need to inspect on moving day, or for your convenience, visit and use the USDA’s pre-prepared spongy moth checklist.

Just Had a Baby? 6 Tips to Make Your Relocation Easier

Babies are bundles of joy, but they are also lots of work. If you’re relocating with a new baby, there are many things you can do to make your relocation smooth. These tips can make your relocation easier overall. Here’s what you need to know.

1. Make a Box or Bag of Baby Essentials

First, create a list of the necessary items you need for your baby. The list should include diapers, baby food, bottles, formula, extra clothes, toys, and other must-have items for your baby during this transition. Since you will be using these essential items right up until the time you depart, you will need to plan to pack the box shortly before you leave.

You may even need several boxes or bags of these baby essentials, depending on the details of your particular household relocation.

If you’re packing things into a box, be sure to label the box and keep that box separate from the other moving cartons. You don’t want to lose track of the box and find yourself unable to find the baby things you need!

2. Research Pediatricians Before You Get There

Find a pediatrician before you get to your new home to ensure that your baby is protected and will have proper medical care if needed. If your baby gets sick or needs help from a doctor shortly after your relocation, you could feel panicky as you search for a doctor. Establish contact with that new pediatrician to find out what you need to do to become a verified patient.

3. Secure Help with Trusted Caregivers

Do you need someone to watch your baby while you pack or when the movers come to move the boxes? If so, get help from someone you trust. This may be a babysitter, a friend, or even a relative. Getting help from someone you trust will give you peace of mind knowing that your baby is being well cared for while you relocate.

4. Have a Baby Proofing Plan

Baby proofing your new home will help make your new house safe for your little one. You may need to buy new babyproofing items for your new home. If this is the case, purchase them before you move so that you can get them set up in your new home as soon as you arrive.

5. Unpack the Nursery First

Prioritize setting up the nursery first upon your arrival. This way, you have a place to change your baby, and they have room to nap and sleep on the first night in your new house. Configure your baby’s room as close to their previous nursery as possible. The familiarity might help you and comfort your baby during the transition.

6. Work With Professional Movers

Hire professional movers to assist you with all the heavy lifting on your moving day. Let the movers handle the challenging and overwhelming logistics so you can focus on your baby.

Hire movers to handle your relocation. To get started with your upcoming move, hire the pros. Contact us today.

5 Tips for Clearing Out Your Pantry Before Your Move

In the weeks and days leading up to a move, the chances are you’ll have a lot of food to eat up or clear out. Emptying your pantry makes for a lighter relocation, saves money on takeout, and reduces food waste. Here are a few tips for clearing out your pantry before your household move.

1. Check Expiration Dates

First, check expiration dates and discard any food items that have exceeded their date stamp. Next, choose non-expired food you will probably not plan to eat and consider donating these items to a local food bank. Finally, you can use any unexpired food to help plan meals for when you’re still living in your home.

2. Take Inventory of Food You Have

You can make excellent healthy, and well-rounded meals using these main staples along with any fresh veggies or proteins you have in your refrigerator:

  • Dried beans
  • Pasta
  • Rice
  • Canned tomatoes and gravies

You can use canned soup, cereals, oatmeal, and any sauces or condiments with the above staples in a pinch or combine them with proteins you have on hand.

3. Avoid Buying New Food

While it’s likely that you’ll have a few grocery runs during the weeks leading up to your move, try to focus more on using up what you’ve already got. Plan meals using these foods instead – plug in your ingredients into an online search engine designed for no waste when it comes to food, and come up with creative new meal ideas. Then, if you’re short an ingredient or two, when you go shopping, stick to your list to ensure you don’t overbuy.

4. Carefully Pack Foods You Don’t Finish

Dry goods are very move-friendly. You can safely move foods like dry pasta, cereals, grains, herbs, condiments, and baking ingredients, even if the packages are open — as long as you seal the open containers with tape.

Other preventative steps include using resealable plastic bags around items that might leak or spill. For example, flour and sugar can be messy, so after you tape the container closed, place them in a plastic bag for added protection. Then place them in the moving carton. Lastly, label each food box so it is highlighted and can be stored accordingly during transport.

5. Discard What You Can’t Eat

Discard any remaining items in the end that are either half-used or otherwise unable to be transported or donated. Reduce waste by recycling cans, boxes, or glass once you empty the last of your pantry.

We Can Help Make Your Move Easy!

With good planning, you can reduce your pantry stuff significantly by the time you move. The above steps will help you reduce food waste, help others in need through donations, and provide tasty easy-to-make meals in the remaining days before your move.

Are you interested in a free quote? Contact us today. We’re happy to answer any questions or provide information about the additional moving services we offer.

Settling in as a Singleton: Putting Yourself out There

It’s exciting, unfamiliar and even a little scary, so keep in mind that your journey to a new place is also a journey to a different way of living, too. In fact, finding home as a singleton could be one of the most amazing adventures you’ll ever have.   

Whether you’re recently uncoupled, widowed or striking out on your own after living with a roommate (or two), the important thing is you’re part of a new community that’s full of new people to meet, places to explore and stuff to do. 

Here are five basic tips every singleton like you needs to consider in order to make this new chapter in your life the best yet. 

Be Smart about Safety and Security 

Unless it’s a brand-new space, you never know to whom the previous owner or tenant gave their keys. If possible, have the locks changed, and consider getting a home security system or door camera. When you move with Mayflower, you could qualify for a complimentary doorbell camera and free installation with one of ADT’s top authorized dealers.

And while this might seem a little paradoxical, urban singletons — especially apartment dwellers who don’t have a door attendant — need to find a Keeper of the Keys. This could be your super, a nearby friend or a reliable neighbor. After all, it’s no fun calling a locksmith at 2 a.m. when your keys have gone missing. 

Leverage Social Connections (and Social Media) 

In a lot of cases, you’ll know people (or people who know people) who live in the area. They can provide a much-needed extra level of support until you get your bearings. New co-workers are also a great resource for advice on what to see and do.  

Get the word out on channels like Instagram and Facebook and ask your contacts to connect you to anyone locally they might know. That said, it can be all too easy (especially if you tend to be a bit shy) to substitute social media for “real” life. Don’t hide behind a screen; this is the time to make human connections. 

Get out and about 

It takes time after you’ve moved in before you’re able to settle into a routine. Take advantage of this window — step out of your comfort zone, and by all means keep your eyes, ears and mind open. 

Scope out the new neighborhood. You’ll soon see the areas where married couples live with kids; younger singles hang out; major shopping districts are located; and people gather on weekends and after work. A stroll down Main Street is a wonderful way to feel part of your new community, let people know you’ve arrived, and familiarize yourself with the town’s pace and vibe.  

If your new home is in a bigger city, use public transportation. That’s how the locals do it and as soon as you’ve mastered the nuances (and let’s face it, peculiarities) of the city’s mass transit system, the sooner you’ll feel at home. Larger cities will also have culture-rich neighborhoods full of authentic fare, as well as cultural experiences waiting to be explored.  

If you live in a touristy area, by all means be a tourist yourself and get the sightseeing out of your system while you’re still new in town. Odds are you’ll avoid them once you’ve settled into town. However, it’d be weird to live in, say, Seattle without having been to the Space Needle. 

Put Yourself on a Budget 

While visiting local hot spots or dining in restaurants may sound wonderful, new singletons should always be careful about overspending, especially during the first few months. For one thing, expenses will almost certainly be higher since you’re solely responsible for the mortgage or rent, food and utilities.  

If you’re coming from a roommate or partner arrangement, you’ll need extra funds to buy the stuff you used to share communally, like furniture, appliances, and pots and pans. The upside is you’ll finally be able to truly decorate according to your own personal style. 

Another “budget” to think about is your time. Remember you’re no longer sharing household chores, lawncare and/or pet care responsibilities. Factor in some extra time to handle these additional duties. 

Deep Dive into Your New Community 

Be a joiner. It’s the best way to make new friends and open yourself up to new possibilities. For some this may be joining a place of worship or a community center. Others might find volunteering for a non-profit, participating in a book club or playing on a local amateur sports team more their style.   

If you live in a city, it’s also wise to invest in a museum membership: they often host members-only events full of people with shared interests. Feeling brave? Try something you’ve never done before. Whether it’s a pottery class, a neighborhood clean-up or a Zumba session, it’s the perfect way to make friends with people exploring new things just like you.  

As you explore and settle into your new neighborhood, we’re here to help. Be sure to check out our blog for tips to help your new city feel familiar — and help you feel at home. 

7 Things to Consider When Relocating or Expanding Your Company

If done correctly, relocating or expanding your business to a new place can increase your revenues and profitability. However, it also requires some adjustment. Here are things to consider when relocating or expanding your company.

1. Site Selection

When selecting your new company location, consider why you are moving or expanding. For example, is one of your goals to move closer to potential or current customers? Or, are you seeking to locate operations in a lower-cost city? Your goals will guide you toward an initial list of potential cities.

Before you make a final choice, ask other business owners what they think of the location. Also, check if local organizations or governments provide relocation assistance, such as tax incentives, training grants, and site development help.

2. Market Research

Research the demographics, competitive landscape, and needs in the prospective location to ensure your product or service has a niche there. Also, understand consumer habits in the region before making a move. Your lender will want to ensure you’ve completed this research step if you need financing.

3. Financing

Often, a business expansion requires financing either through a loan or the equity of the current or additional owners. Before the move, consider which of these options will work best for you and take steps to put your financing in place.

4. Ecosystem Support

If you are trying to break into a new market, you’ll want as much support as possible. Consider who in your network knows people within the new ecosystem and ask them to help you create relationships in the new location.

5. Cost

Cost is a critical factor in every business decision, including locations. Cost affects you in several ways. The first is the rent, taxes, and utilities you’ll pay for the new space. The second is the cost of living for employees. If you’re moving from an inexpensive region of the country to a more expensive one, you’ll need to pay much higher wages to convince employees to work for you in the new location.

If you want to expand to an area with a small budget, consider the minimum viable expansion option to achieve your goals. For example, you may not necessarily need to open a large office at first. Perhaps you can start with a smaller space and one or two employees to test the market before committing to a more extensive operation.

6. Culture and Customs

Cities have different cultures. Some regions, for example, are more casual about appropriate dress or time schedules, while others are more formal. Employees also differ in their expectations of employers based on region.

7. Leadership Options

If you are relocating, you’ll want to identify key leadership candidates among your current staff and offer the necessary relocation packages to encourage them to relocate.

If you are expanding into a new location, you’ll also likely want an employee to relocate to head the new venture, at least initially. A current employee understands your company values and can better represent the brand than a new one. Once settled, you can hire a new head from among the local staff.

Office Movers, You Can Trust

Contact us for help with your office relocation. In addition, we can help you with the planning and execution of this significant undertaking.

How to Pack Your Car for a Cross-Country Move

It’s an understatement to say there are a lot of things to keep track of during a cross-country move. And if you have belongings, kids, fur babies and a vehicle you’ve opted to drive to your new address, there’s a cross-country road trip to think about, too. 

To ensure your long-distance move goes smoothly, it helps to plan what to pack in your car — and know how to make it all fit so you minimize stress, mitigate surprises and make an adventure out of the road ahead.  

The first place to start? With a spare key to avoid lockouts. And that important paperwork and other non-allowable items? Those irreplaceable keepsakes? Keep them with you.  

Pack Layers of Clothing 

It goes without saying, but you need clothes — specifically enough clothes and the right kind of clothing for the conditions you’ll encounter. Depending on where you’re moving, you may encounter a variety of climates — even unpredictable weather. Make sure you pack layers and do include a jacket or coat since you never know what the weather holds at varying elevations or weather patterns that are beyond your control.  

  • Layers of clothing that account for changes in weather and temperature 
  • Loungewear or pajamas 
  • Workwear if required 
  • Extra undergarments and socks 

Don’t Forget the Toiletries 

Comfort, hygiene and self-care are also key when you’re on the road, so these items prove helpful as well: 

  • Light blankets and pillows for napping 
  • Facewash, shampoo, conditioner, soap and styling products 
  • Toothpaste, toothbrush and mouthwash 
  • Lotion 

Remember to Pack Snacks 

Keep grouchy kids and hangry adults at bay by packing portable, healthy snacks. 

A cooler filled with drinks and temperature-sensitive snacks, sandwiches, veggies and fruit 

  • Nuts, dried fruit, crackers 
  • Utensils 
  • Napkins 
  • Single-serve condiments 

Keep Everyone Entertained Throughout the Journey 

Limit the “are we there yet” by bringing enough things to entertain the whole gang for the duration of the drive. 

  • Music 
  • Audio books 
  • Road trip games 
  • Travel-friendly toys 
  • Tablet for streaming shows and movies 
  • Cords for charging your gear 
  • Portable chargers 

Make Sure Your Pets are Comfortable and Cared For 

Traveling with your furry friends? You need to keep them comfortable and safe, too. 

  • Pet carrier(s) that accommodate  
  • Litter box for cats 
  • Leashes and collars/harnesses  
  • Pet identification tags 
  • Up-to-date immunization and ownership records 
  • Pet beds 
  • No-spill food and water dishes 
  • Anti-anxiety medication 
  • Toys 
  • Food and food dishes 
  • Treats 

Prepare for the Unexpected with a First Aid Kit 

Hopefully, you’ll never need to kiss boo-boos and apply band-aids. However, it’s important to be prepared, just in case. Your first aid kit should contain: 

  • Sterile cleaning pads  
  • Antibacterial ointment 
  • Band-aids 
  • Tweezers 
  • A small pair of scissors 
  • Aspirin and Ibuprofen  
  • Instant cold or hot compress 
  • Sterile gauze pads 
  • Stretchy bandage wrap  
  • Non-latex gloves 
  • Cloth tape 

Invest in an Emergency Car Care Kit 

No one wants to think about a vehicle breakdown. Still, you should be prepared in the event an issue occurs. 

  • Jumper cables 
  • Tire pressure gauge 
  • Spare tire 
  • Reflective warning triangle and flares 
  • Safety hammer and seatbelt cutters 
  • Tow rope 
  • Hand crank 
  • Safety vest 
  • Folding garden/snow shovel 
  • Blanket 
  • Snow scraper 
  • Anti-slip gloves 
  • PVC tape 
  • Tool kit 

Miscellaneous Things to Bring on a Cross-Country Drive 

There are a number of basic odds and ends that are worth bringing along on your cross-country move. 

  • A roll of paper towels 
  • A jug of water 
  • Garbage bags 
  • Hand sanitizer and sanitizing spray 
  • Cleaning wipes 
  • Wet wipes 
  • Baby wipes 
  • Kleenex 

How to Pack Your Car for a Cross-Country Move 

If you plan on packing luggage or equipment on the top of your vehicle, make sure that it is securely tied down. It helps to use a specially designed cargo compartments — such as an adjustable, waterproof, soft-sided roof rack — that can be secured to the top of a vehicle. Never pack valuables on the exterior of your car since they could be stolen. 

As for how to keep it all organized, clear plastic bins let you see what’s inside so you don’t have to dig. Soft-sided bins work well for items you’re less likely to need access to. As for heavier items, they should go inside — not on top of — your vehicle. Take care to pack them below lighter items that could get damaged or crushed. 

Looking for more tips on how to streamline and simplify your long-distance move? Visit our blog for expert tips and tricks. 

How to Find Daycare in Your New Neighborhood

Finding good child care can be challenging, yet it is a priority when you make a household move into a new community. Here are some tips for finding daycare or other forms of child care in your new neighborhood.

Start Early

Start looking as soon as you know about your move. Some areas have a shortage of reasonable care, especially for infants who require a smaller child-to-adult ratio. Doing your research and applying early improves your chances of finding a slot in a highly-rated center.

Determine Your Child’s Individual Needs

Every child is unique and has unique needs. If you are already using daycare, you may know the types of programs that work best for your child. However, consult your pediatrician before deciding if your child has a chronic physical condition, such as asthma, diabetes, seizures, or allergies.

Use Apps and Websites

Various apps and websites can help with your initial search. Childcare.gov will link you to state child care search websites. Other apps include:

  • Winnie, a marketplace of daycare and preschool programs that is available on a site and an app
  • Sittercity, a Web-based platform to connect parents with sitters and nannies
  • Momni, an app that offers global care-sharing
  • UrbanSitter, an app and Website platform that provides sitters, nannies, and tutors
  • Care.com, a site that helps you find nannies, babysitters, tutors, and daycare facilities in your neighborhood

Visit Each Program

Visit each finalist in person to see what the classrooms and play areas look like, how teachers interact with students, and what a child’s typical day will be like. If you hire a nanny, interview the finalists carefully and see how your child and the prospective choice interact.

Specifically, look for things such as:

  • Can teachers always see the children?
  • Do teachers look the child in the eye when they speak to them?
  • Are both indoor and outdoor spaces used for play? And does the program offer a variety of toys?
  • Do you hear laughter?
  • Are areas clean and clean-smelling?

Ask questions, such as the program’s philosophy, how they handle challenging behaviors, and staff turnover rates. Ask how often children are allowed to play outside and how the program lessens the spread of disease.

Check Quality Ratings, Accreditation and Licensing

Not all states require daycare programs to be licensed, but the best programs usually are. Even among states that require licensing, New York requires a five-to-one adult-child ratio for 2-year-olds, but Florida requires an 11-to-1 ratio. Be sure you understand what licensing means in your new state.

Some child care programs are accredited through professional organizations, such as the National Association for the Education of Young Children. Accredited programs will also meet specific quality standards.

Finally, check quality ratings. Most states use symbols, such as stars, to indicate quality. The provider earns more stars as they meet additional quality standards. Remember that each state has its own quality standards and rating system, so research what each rating means in your new community. Your state’s resource page can provide more details about ratings.

Online reviews are another way to gauge whether a program is doing a good job.

Making the Move

Are you planning your relocation? You undoubtedly face a lot of work and tough choices during your move. Let us help with your relocation. We can handle the packing and heavy lifting. Contact us today for a free quote.

Relocating for a Partner? Here’s How to Make the Right Moves Together

Believe it or not, there’s a name for people who relocate on behalf of a significant other: “trailing partners.” Ok, that sounds a bit harsh, but it doesn’t necessarily mean you’re second fiddle. In fact, this unique moving situation can be mutually beneficial. It’s all about viewing it not just as an opportunity for your partner, but for you as well.  

You’re in a relationship because you care – and care deeply – about someone besides yourself (that’s a big plus right there). What’s most important right now is a bit of planning, a lot of soul searching and a willingness to stay open-minded and make some very important decisions together. 

Here are a few tips and tricks for helping you and your loved one navigate this new chapter in your lives:  

Do the Due Diligence 

Before a final decision is made, you should have already investigated – and determined – what life might look like after you move. This is where the two of you might want to make a list of all the pros and cons. 

  • If it’s because of your partner’s promotion or a new job with a heftier salary, make sure you’ve investigated the cost of living in your new city. What looks like a big pay increase on paper could be a step down if you’re relocating from a relatively inexpensive area to someplace like the San Francisco Bay Area. Also, does your partner’s new job offer strong prospects for a steady move up their career ladder? 
  • If it’s because your partner will be caring for a parent or other loved one, the two of you need to decide whether it makes more sense to move them vs. the two of you (and potentially your immediate family). Conversely, would you be leaving family who may need your support now or down the road? 
  • How will the move affect any children still living at home? For example, are the schools good, is the area safe? In general, a long-distance move is probably less of an adjustment for a grade schooler than it is for a teen entering their senior year of high school.   
  • Will the current trend toward hybrid and remote work provide new opportunities you can leverage to your advantage? 
  •  As the trailing partner, will you be able to find a good job in the new location – and a rewarding social life? Some bigger companies offer placement assistance for an employee’s significant other. Check into it. 
  • What is there to do – and see – there? Does the new location offer comparable sports, entertainment and cultural options? 

Make Your Voice – and Needs – Heard 

As the trailing partner, it’s natural to feel a loss of control – and even a little resentment – but keep the bigger picture in mind. Once the decision’s been made, actively participate in the process. A good partnership needs to flex well beyond 50/50 and with a major change like this, there’s not always going to be a one-size-fits-all solution. Open the door for honest discussions and be prepared for some give and take.  

Schedule a Visit 

Let’s assume you both did an online “deep dive” as part of the due diligence process. Now it’s time to plan a visit to your new city and get a sense of what it would be like to live there. Both partners will feel a lot more excited about the move if you spend time together exploring the new neighborhood. Consider what’s important to you and other family members and don’t rely totally on online reviews and others’ opinions. Here are some tips and tricks you can use to feel at home in your new neighborhood.

Keep Your Options Open 

Before committing to buying a home and settling down, it might be a wise move to rent a place for a year or two. Then if the situation changes or the new job doesn’t work out, you’ll still have your old home to fall back on. Could your partner’s new situation lend itself to a remote or hybrid work set-up? Perhaps a remote work situation combined with a temporary period of living in both places (with regular visits) could ease the transition into your new life together.

Wherever You Go, Be There for Each Other 

Whether they’re starting a new job, getting a big promotion or taking care of a close family member, always keep in mind that your partner’s going through a significant change in their life too! Look for ways to be supportive and understanding. And reach out to them for the same!  

Whether you’re in a new city right now or considering finding a new home, we’re here to not just move you, but help you feel at home along the way.